Hair TV Commercials Explained...

Hair TV Commercials Explained…

hair product ingredients explained

We’ve all been mesmerized by commercials using fancy sounding ingredients in their products either to make us buy a certain product or spend more on a special product. Whether it’s jojoba oil, the mega popular argan oil or even the common honey, they all promise miraculous effects on your hair and skin. But how accurate are these commercials and labels? Is there real evidence that these ingredients work?

Some of the natural ingredients out there have indeed a positive effect on your skin and hair but for most ingredients there is little evidence to support the benefits they claim.

Here is a list for the most popular ingredients commonly used by the beauty industry and their real effects on your skin and hair:

Jojoba Oil

Organic jojoba oil

What it is: a type of oil produced by the seeds of Simmondsia chinensis that became popular when whale oil imports were banned in the US in 1971.

Marketed as

  • It’s a key ingredient in products marketed as “natural”
  • It’s also marketed by itself as a superior moisturizer and similar to the oil in the skin (however, this has not been proven)

What it actually does:

  • It’s used as an additive in cosmetic products
  • It’s a good moisturizer and fungicide
  • It has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties
  • It simulates collagen production

Adverse Effects:

  • It is likely safe to be applied on the skin but it may cause rashes to people with a sensitive skin as well as allergic reactions

Aloe Vera

Organic Aloe Vera Gel

What it is: a succulent plant species that has been extremely popular in the cosmetic industry.

Marketed as

  • An effective skin soothing ingredient
  • A conditioner for dry skin
  • As having astringent properties
  • As having healing properties for wounds and scars

What it actually does

  • There is no evidence that aloe vera helps the skin and the few studies that have shown benefits have been contradicted by other studies
  • The plant has some anti-inflammatory and antibacterial qualities but it’s not superior to other plants

Adverse Effects

  • Topical use of aloe vera is not associated with any notable side effects; isolated cases have reported burns and itching when applied on the skin

Honey

Organic manuka honey

What it is: a sweet yellow brown fluid made by bees using nectar from flowers.

Marketed as

  • An anti-inflammatory product
  • A source of antioxidants that will maintain a youthful looking skin
  • Great for healing wounds and getting rid of scars
  • A natural antibiotic and antiseptic
  • A skin moisturizer

What it actually does

  • Honey can act as a sealant and retain the skin’s moisture
  • It has antimicrobial effects depending on the types of flowers that were used in its production
  • There is very little evidence showing that honey actually helps with inflammation
  • There is some evidence supporting honey’s role in burn wounds as it may act as a protectant as it seals the wound and may help in the treatment of antibiotic resistant bacteria

Adverse effects

  • When used topically there are no adverse effects; however, those allergic to pollen may have some allergic reactions.

Shea Butter

Organic leave in conditioners

What it is: the fat extracted from the nut produced by the Shea tree.

Marketed as

  • An anti-inflammatory product
  • Having an anti-irritant effect on the skin
  • Superior emollient properties
  • The capacity to absorb ultraviolet radiation and therefore viable as a sun blocking lotion

What it actually does

  • Studies show that shea butter is indeed a great moisturizer and emollient
  • Some isolated chemicals found in shea butter have anti-inflammatory purposes
  • As a sun block it has a limited capacity to absorb ultraviolet radiation
  • There is little evidence to suggest anti-irritation properties on the skin

Side Effects

There are no side effects for topical treatment with shea butter.


Avocado Oil

Avacado

What it is: Oil pressed from the avocado fruit.

Marketed as

  • A moisturizer with an incredible high level of skin penetration
  • Having healing and anti-inflammatory properties for the skin
  • A miraculous anti-aging ingredient

What it actually does

  • It’s a good moisturizer and does indeed have a high level of skin penetration
  • A study showed improvement in patients suffering from psoriasis and used avocado oil as a topical treatment in combination with vitamin B12
  • Avocado oil is rich in antioxidants and makes a good treatment for sunburns and dry skin
  • Used topically avocado oil may promote hair growth

Side Effects

  • Some people who used avocado oil topically reported mild itching

Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil shampoo

What it is

An essential oil extracted from the leaves of Melaleuca alternifoli.

Marketed as

  • A natural way to heal skin infections
  • A remedy for sunburns and rashes
  • A cure for various skin fungi
  • A cure for psoriasis and other skin conditions
  • A treatment for dandruff and other scalp diseases

What it actually does

  • Tea tree oil does indeed contain antimicrobial properties and may be an effective treatment when it comes to dandruff, acne and even herpes
  • Tea tree oil helps cure wounds and may help in the treatment of skin infections and sunburns
  • There is some evidence showing that tea tree oil when applied topically may reduce rashes caused by nickel exposure

Side Effects

Tea tree oil can cause skin irritation, swelling, skin dryness, itching, stinging, burning and redness.


Argan Oil

Argan Oil hair mask for straightenign hair

What it is: an oil produced from the kernels of the argan tree.

Marketed as

  • A skin moisturizer and hair conditioner
  • Having the ability to tame frizz and add more shine to the hair
  • Reducing wrinkles and having an anti-aging effect
  • Perfect for skin conditions such as dermatitis, dry skin or acne

What it actually does

  • There is little evidence to suggest that argan oil will cure various skin conditions
  • The oil is not a superior skin ingredient but it does make a good moisturizer and emollient, thus can be a good addition to hair and skin products
  • There is no evidence to suggest that argan oil reduces wrinkles or has an anti-aging effect

Side Effects

  • There are no known side effects when argan oil is used topically

Coconut Oil

Organic extra virgin coconut oil

What it is: oil extracted from coconuts.

Marketed as

  • Sunscreen
  • A moisturizer and emollient
  • Reducing protein loss in hair
  • Having antioxidant properties and helping heal psoriasis, dermatitis, acne and eczema

What it actually does

  • Lauric acid extracted from coconut oil may have benefits in treating some forms of acne
  • There is little evidence that coconut oil is an excellent sunscreen and should never be a substitute for a real sunblock
  • There is some evidence that coconut oil reduces protein loss in hair
  • Coconut oil is indeed a great moisturizer and emollient due to its high fat content
  • Reports that coconut oil is a complete treatment for all skin problems are anecdotal and not based on solid research

Side effects

  • Some people may be allergic to coconut oil

Lavender Oil

What it is: oil obtained from the flower spikes of various types of lavender.

Marketed As

  • Effective treatment for acne and eczema
  • Skin detoxifier and inhibitor of skin bacteria
  • A good toner for the skin as it simulates blood flow
  • Promotes hair growth and aids in treatment of alopecia and scalp problems
  • Stopping hair loss

What it actually does

  • It has some antibacterial properties
  • Topical applications of a concentration as little as 0.25% may cause cell death
  • The oil has no natural protection against autoxidation which means it can produce allergies and skin irritation
  • There is a study showing that lavender oil inhibits skin bacteria
  • here are no evidence to show lavender oil promotes hair growth or stops hair loss

Side Effects

  • Cell death in concentration over 0.25%, skin irritant, may cause rashes, itching, burning.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Olive Oil

What it is

Oil of superior quality obtained from the fruit of the Olea europaea.

Marketed as

  • A moisturizer and emollient
  • An anti-aging product
  • Keeping hair healthy and reducing hair loss

What it actually does

  • Olive oil is indeed beneficial for the skin as its rich fat content can help with dry skin
  • It may offer some protection against UVB damage
  • It may cause problems for the skin when used on its own because it delays the healing of injured skin
  • Works well as makeup remover
  • Contains vitamin E which is an antioxidant and great for the skin and hair

Side Effects

It isn’t likely to be an irritant or cause allergic reactions.


Arnica Extract

What it is: an extract from the flower of Arnica Montana.

Marketed as

  • Aiding in treatment of skin infections and eczema
  • A treatment for frost bite
  • Ading in the treatment of stretch marks
  • Beneficial in hair care as it is considered to have restorative and nourishing properties
  • A treatment for dandruff, split ends and grey hair

What it actually does

  • Research shows that high amounts of arnica cause skin irritation, kills skin cells and blocks antioxidants in the skin
  • May be used to treat insect bites
  • There are no studies showing that it treats infections, eczema or frost bytes
  • There is no evidence showing that it can be used as a treatment of stretch marks
  • There is no evidence that arnica extract helps promote hair growth or treats any scalp issues

Side effects

It may cause allergies and contact dermatitis.


Eucalyptus Oil

What it is: oil from the leaf of Eucalyptus.

Marketed as

  • A treatment for hair that can replace other hair chemical treatments
  • Effective for wound healing
  • Offers anti-inflammatory benefits to the skin
  • A natural insect repellent

What it actually does

  • Studies show that it does have anti-inflammatory properties
  • Eucalyptus oil shouldn’t be applied on its own on the skin because studies show it might cause contact dermatitis
  • It has antimicrobial and antifungal activity so it can be used in the treatment of various scalp problems
  • It has been shown that its powerful fragrance makes it an insect repellent

Side effects

Skin irritant, can cause allergies, can cause contact dermatitis.


Algae Extract

What it is: a general term for extracts of various algae that can include thousands of species.

Marketed as

  • A source of antioxidants
  • Having anti-inflammatory properties
  • Healing the skin and eliminating wrinkles

What it actually does

  • It is a skin irritant due to a substance called phycocyanin
  • Depending on the types of algae, it can contain various vitamins and nourishing agents for the skin such as vitamin B1, iron, magnesium, copper, calcium, etc.
  • It can be very hard to find out what type of algae have been used in your product to actually assess whether it has benefits for you or not
  • There is no evidence tot show that algae extract can eliminate wrinkles

Side effects

Possible skin irritant, may cause contact dermatitis.


Lemongrass Extract/Oil

What it is: oil extracted from the plant commonly known as lemongrass.

Marketed as

  • A tonic and astringent
  • Increases hair growth
  • A treatment for various scalp conditions and for oily hair

What it actually does

  • Studies show that it may have antibacterial properties however it may cause skin irritations and it’s not suitable for regular use on the skin
  • Can be used successfully as a mosquito repellent

Side effects

  • Can cause irritation

Barley Extract

What it is: extract of barley, a common cereal known as Hordeum Vulgare.

Marketed as

  • A good source of antioxidant
  • It can reduce inflammation
  • Nourishes and moisturizes the hair

What it actually does

  • There is evidence that barley extract has antioxidant properties
  • Barley can reduce inflammation in animals but this hasn’t been tested on humans
  • It has moisturizing properties but they are not superior to other products

Side effects

  • there are no known side effects when used topically

Ginseng

Korean Panax Gingseng

What it is: any of the 11 species of perennial plants belonging to the family Araliaceae.

Marketed as

  • An anti-aging treatment
  • A toner that leaves the skin fresh
  • Excellent treatment of various skin diseases like eczema, acne or dry skin
  • Nourishes the hair and simulates hair growth while also combating hair loss

What it actually does

  • studies have shown that it may have antioxidant properties as well as wound healing properties
  • There is research showing that it can stimulate collagen production
  • There is little evidence showing that ginseng has any benefit when applied topically

Side effects

  • There are no known side effects when it comes to topically using ginseng

Papaya Extract

What it is: extract from the tropical plant papaya.

Marketed as

  • Helps boost hair strength and can be used in the treatment for balding
  • May prevent dandruff
  • A hair conditioner and helps in the treatment for alopecia

What it actually does

  • The enzymes in papaya have exfoliating properties on the skin
  • Papaya can be a skin irritant if applied for too long

Side effects

  • There are likely no side effects known for papaya; however, it may irritate sensitive skin, especially scalp skin; people with latex allergies will have an allergy when coming in contact with papaya

Calendula Extract

What it is: the extract from the plant called Calendula officinalis, also known commonly as marigold.

Marketed as

  • An emollient and rich moisturizer for the skin
  • An antiseptic and an aid to wound healing
  • Helps with dermatitis

What it actually does

  • There is some research showing that it has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties
  • There is no evidence that the plant helps with dermatitis
  • It doesn’t have superior moisturizing qualities compared with other plant extracts

Side effects

People with ragweed rashes should not apply calendula topically.


Caffeine

Does caffeine shampoo work

What it is: a substance found in coffee, some teas or certain nuts that acts as a stimulant.

Marketed as

  • Having anti-inflammatory properties
  • Helping hair growth and is popularly used in the treatment of hair loss
  • Reducing cellulite
  • Helping with dark circles
  • Promoting blood circulation where applied
  • Helping in the treatment of rosacea
  • Helping tighten skin
  • Repairing sunburn

What it actually does

  • Studies show that caffeine leads to stimulation of hair follicle growth
  • rinking caffeine not applying may help with damage by exposure to uvb light
  • There is evidence showing that caffeine, applied on the skin, has anti-inflammatory properties
  • There is no evidence that caffeine reduces rosacea
  • There is no evidence that caffeine reduces cellulite

Side effects

  • There are no known side effects when caffeine is applied topically

Hibiscus

What it is: a flowering plant in the mallow family used for its chemical properties and fragrance.

Marketed as

  • A powerful anti-ageing product
  • Eliminating skin blemishes and evening the skin tone
  • A natural hair growth ingredient
  • A moisturizer
  • Eliminating fungus and treating dandruff

What it actually does

  • Has a high fragrance potency which causes it to irritate skin in some cases
  • There is evidence that the plant contains antioxidants, however, there isn’t evidence that they may be absorbed through the skin
  • The plant has a significant amount of vitamin E which has benefits for hair and skin
  • Certain types of hibiscus have wound healing properties and improve sunburnt skin
  • There is little evidence suggesting that hibiscus promotes hair growth

Side effects

May cause skin irritation.


Cucumber Extract

What it is: extract of cucumber, a plant from the family Cucurbitaceae.

Marketed as

  • A moisturizer
  • A source of antioxidants
  • Containing anti-aging properties
  • A hair conditioner

What it actually does

  • There is only anecdotal evidence that cucumber has anti-inflammatory and calming properties
  • There is some research showing that the lutein in cucumber helps with skin discoloration
  • Some components of cucumber have been shown to protect skin against carcinogenic substances
  • The high water content in cucumber makes it a hydrating agent

Side effects

There are no side effects known.


Grape Seed Extract

What it is: extract from the seeds of grapes.

Marketed as

    Helping prevent hair loss and regrow hair
  • As having detoxifying agents that help aging skin and hair
  • As a superior moisturizer due to the rich level of fatty acids
  • Helping fight skin cancer

What it actually does

  • Grape seed extract contains a lot of antioxidants that seem to help damaged skin and skin exposed to sun
  • Grape seed extract has been shown to promote wound healing
  • Topical application of grape seed extract in combination with other types of antioxidant components can help reduce the biomarkers for skin cancer
  • Studies show that grape seed extract on its own will not help with hair loss

Side effects

There is no evidence that grape seed oil has side effects when applied topically.


Canola Oil

What it is: oil made from the seeds of Brassicaceae family of plants.

Marketed as

  • Having properties that diminish wrinkles and fine lines
  • Helping with acne and blemishes
  • Having a high amount of antioxidants that will help achieve a more youthful looking skin
  • Having high moisturizing content

What it actually does

  • Studies suggests that canola oil helps repair wounded skin
  • There is evidence that canola oil has anti-inflammatory properties
  • Canola oil has components that make it a great conditioner and skin moisturizer

Side effects

There are no side effects for topical use.


Palm Oil

What it is: oil extracted mainly from the fruit of the African oil palm and other oil palm trees.

Marketed as:

  • Having healing benefits for the skin
  • Nourishing and conditioning the hair
  • Containing antioxidant properties
  • Maintaining the hair follicles and healing damaged ones

What it actually does

  • Palm oil has great moisturizing properties and it’s a good moisturizer and conditioner
  • There is no evidence suggesting that palm oil helps with damaged hair follicles or has any effect on hair follicles

Side effects

Does not cause allergies or irritation when topically used.

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